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Daniel Israeli
Adv. Daniel Israeli

Electra City Tower
58 Harakevet St.
Tel Aviv
6777016

Daniel Israeli

Daniel is a lawyer in the firm’s Capital Markets & Securities department, specializing in providing advisory services to companies on legal issues relating to the capital market & securities and corporate law.

Daniel has experience in providing legal advice to public and private companies in relation to various aspects of corporate law and securities law, including IPOs and the subsequent offers of securities, debt and equity offerings, public and private placements and tender offers. All this in addition to the on-going corporate and securities advice and representation of the firm’s clients before the Israeli Securities Authority and at the Tel-Aviv Stock Exchange Ltd.

 

Daniel provides legal advice to a wide range of investment funds, financial entities, portfolio management, investment advisers, investment marketers and underwriters (including representing underwriters in public equity offerings in the NASDAQ). Daniel also advises on issues related to virtual and digital currencies and blockchain technology.

 

Prior to joining our firm, Daniel worked at a law firm specializing in the capital market, investment funds and financial entities and served as a teaching assistant in a corporate law course at Sha’arei Mishpat Law School.

 

Daniel is a member of the high-tech committee of the Israel Bar Association and the capital markets and Business forum of the Israel Bar Association.

Education:


Sha’arei Mishpat Law School (LL.B., specializing in commercial law), 2013

Bar-Ilan University (LL.M., specializing in commercial law), 2014.

Admission:


Member of Israel Bar Association since 2014



News and updates - Daniel Israeli:


September 19, 2017

ICO Whitepaper

It is nearly impossible to keep track of the developments in the cryptocurrency and ICO arena, with new digital currencies being launched and new ICOs records frequently being broken.

 

Recently, the record was broken once again, when Filecoin’s ICO raised about USD 200 million in one hour (!), after having raised about USD 52 million from investment funds and private investors in the presale ahead of the ICO.

 

So what is an ICO?

ICO is the abbreviation of Initial Coin Offering, a term inspired by the capital market term IPO (Initial Public Offering). This is when a company recruits debt or capital by publishing a prospectus offering of its securities to the public for the first time. A prospectus is a profound legal and accounting document that furnishes information about the company, its management, its businesses, and its financial position. Once a company’s securities are held by the public, it becomes a public company.

 

In an ICO, companies that are developing a technology or an innovative venture, which, for the most part, is based on blockchain technology, recruit capital through the issuing of digital coins. The hope is that the coins' value will appreciate when the venture succeeds and will maximize profits for the coin buyers in the ICO.

 

To date, digital coins and ICOs are unregulated in most countries. However, the US Securities Exchange Commission (SEC), the Central Bank of Singapore (MAS), the Canadian Securities Authority (CSA), and the Israel Securities Authority (ISA) have all already announced they are considering applying in some cases the existing securities regulations also to digital coins and ICOs (such regulations include restrictions in public offerings, prospectus and reporting requirements, etc.)

 

Despite the lack of regulation, as well as the lack of uniformity with regard to the quality of the information being disclosed, the practice is that when launching a new token or actual digital coin and an ICO, the company publishes a document on the ICO’s website that furnishes information about the venture or the technology, pertinent financial data, and information about the offering itself. This document is called a ‘Whitepaper’.

 

It is reasonable to assume that once leading countries enact regulations for digital currencies, including a binding standard for whitepapers, this market will become more regulated.

 

Following are some helpful tips for new ventures still in the pre-ICO stage and who want to make their whitepapers accessible to potential investors.

 

Mode of presentation of the information

When an investor considers whether it is worthwhile to participate in an ICO, he wants to know why purchasing coins in the ICO will be a golden opportunity for him and what his resulting profit will be.

 

Unfortunately, companies tend to focus on presenting the technology or the venture in their whitepapers, and they do not attribute enough importance to presenting the financial-economic data. But such data are equally important to potential investors, especially since financial data demonstrate the venture’s potential market value.

 

It may will add value if the whitepaper will include financial data about the company, information about the new coin (or token) to be issued, and information about the technology. Such information should be substantiated by data from reliable sources. It is also advisable and helpful to use infographics—graphs, simulations, and comparative data—that encapsulate the highlights of the ICO clearly and succinctly.

 

Structure of an ICO

An ICO whitepaper should explain how and when investors can participate in the ICO, and in which currencies the investor can purchase the company’s new token (if only through digital coins, so which digital coins; and whether it is also possible to use FIAT money.

 

Notwithstanding the regulatory uncertainty surrounding digital currencies, nearly every developed country imposes anti-money-laundering laws and KYC (know your client) provisions. Therefore, the whitepaper should also inform investors about the identification processes they will have to undergo during the ICO and the required mode of payment.

 

Legal aspects

As stated, most countries have not yet enacted digital currencies regulations that also regulate the mode of performance of an ICO.

 

Consequently, purchasing digital coins and participating in an ICO are still highly risky and thus are not suitable for everyone. Therefore, it is critical to ensure the whitepaper accurately presents the venture and the structure of the ICO. It is recommended that the whitepaper disclose the risk factors unique to the market in which the company operates (in addition to the risks inherent in the digital currencies arena, the lack of regulations, and the absence of any promise that the venture’s success will lead to a rise in the value of the issued coin).

 

In light of the above, and bearing in mind today’s regulatory uncertainty, ventures considering fundraising through digital currencies should act with all due care so that they do not find themselves in violation of securities laws in countries where the ICO is being launched. The applicable law in the territories relevant to the ICO should be meticulously examined.

 

Source: barlaw.co.il

August 8, 2017

Monetary Authority of Singapore to Begin Regulating the Issuance of Virtual Currencies

Adv. Daniel Israeli was interviewed by TheMarker after the Monetary Authority of Singapore (MAS) announced it would begin regulating the issuance of virtual currencies (ICO). Daniel noted that Singapore has developed into a destination of sorts for ICOs, and thus the MAS' decision will certainly change the rules of the game.

August 7, 2017

Supreme Court Precedent – Companies Have the Right to Independent Standing during a Derivative Suit

A significant precedent was handed down recently by the Israeli Supreme Court, whereby a company’s separate and independent standing must be recognized, even after a motion for a derivative suit has been approved.

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